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Controller and Auditor-General

The work of the Controller and Auditor-General is carried out by the Office of the Auditor-General, Audit New Zealand, and private sector auditing firms. Audit New Zealand is a stand-alone business unit with its own website.

136 results found

Research projects

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Completed
Dec 2015
The Canterbury earthquakes in 2010 and 2011 destroyed large parts of Christchurch and the Canterbury region. Since then, central and local government have been leading a programme of recovery that includes many projects to rebuild essential facilities and infrastructure. These projects are taking place in a challenging environment. They are in a city and region that have a high volume of...
Commissioned
Oct 2015
In November 2014, Hon Annette King asked me to look into the performance of Health Benefits Limited (HBL), the decision to wind the entity down, what HBL had cost the health sector, and the benefits it had achieved. After due consideration, I decided to look into the costs and benefits of HBL’s work in the health sector and, where possible, identify lessons that might benefit HBL’s...
Completed
May 2015
As citizens, we need reliable and timely information about the performance of public entities to ask valid questions of those who govern and lead them. Public entities are required to report on: the amount of public money they have spent; the outputs they have delivered for that money; and the results they have achieved. If public entities' reporting is not timely, the information...
Completed
May 2015
New Zealanders place great value on culture and engaging in cultural activities. Public entities in the arts, culture, and heritage sector play an important role in ensuring that all New Zealanders have access to the arts and their heritage, and in supporting and developing artists and arts organisations. Some of these entities are also responsible for conserving many of our national treasures...
Completed
May 2015
Whānau ora is a multifaceted term in wide use that means many different things to many people. At its core is the concept of family well-being. In 2009, the Government recognised that current approaches to service delivery were not serving Māori families well enough. It set up a taskforce to look at new ways of interacting with Māori providers of community-based services. After considering the...
Completed
Apr 2015
This report sets out the findings of our audit of Inland Revenue's governance arrangements for the programme. We decided to look at the programme because significant public money is involved, and the programme is important to Inland Revenue being able to continue to fulfil its core work of collecting Crown revenue and implementing government initiatives. We intend to report further on aspects of...
Completed
Feb 2015
In 2012, my Office started a five-year programme of work to find out how well the education system supports Māori students to achieve their full potential. This is the second performance audit report of that programme. In 2013, the Government updated its Māori education strategy, Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success: 2008-2012. The updated strategy gave greater focus to “educationally powerful”...
Completed
Feb 2015
During consultation on our draft 2013/14 work programme, the Primary Production Committee asked us to consider looking at the Primary Growth Partnership (PGP). In particular, the Committee was concerned about the transparency of PGP, including how well it was being managed and was achieving its objectives. The Auditor-General decided to do a performance audit because of the: potential...
Completed
Feb 2015
Challenging times continued for local authorities in 2013/14. Elected members, many in office for the first time, are being asked to respond to matters of growing complexity, urgency, and consequence. Decisions about significant infrastructure investments are mounting for many local authorities, as are pressures to "manage-down" increasing operational costs and rates demands. Good governance...
Completed
Feb 2015
Upholding the law and protecting people and property can be a dangerous, demanding, and stressful job. To do that job well, the New Zealand Police (the Police) need to have the trust and confidence of the community. To earn trust and confidence, the Police must show respect, consider the needs of victims, and meet very high standards of behaviour. Although sexual assaults are a relatively...

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