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Controller and Auditor-General

The work of the Controller and Auditor-General is carried out by the Office of the Auditor-General, Audit New Zealand, and private sector auditing firms. Audit New Zealand is a stand-alone business unit with its own website.

136 results found

Research projects

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Completed
Oct 2013
The structure of New Zealand's population is changing in different ways, but the main change is that it is ageing. In 2006, there were two children for every older person. In 2023 – only 10 years from now – we could have more people aged 65 or older than we have children under 15. Some regions will have older populations and age more quickly than others. When an increasing proportion of the...
Completed
Jun 2013
Good health is important for children and families now, but also for children’s continued good health and active contribution to society into adulthood. About 31% of children between 2 and 14 years old are classed as obese (about 10%) or overweight (about 21%). The prevalence of child obesity has increased from 8% in 2006/07 to 10% in 2011/12. A 2006 estimate of total costs in health care and...
Completed
Jun 2013
This paper provides a high-level view of insurance for public assets and the main changes after 2010. It does not provide a comprehensive view of all types of insurance in the public sector. I hope that it will inform debate, and that public entities and others will find it helpful when considering insurance as part of risk management. The Canterbury earthquakes have resulted in significant...
Completed
Jun 2013
Our Office's theme for 2012/13 has been: Our future needs – is the public sector ready? During the year, we completed projects that look at different aspects of the public sector to consider whether we are ready for the future. This paper provides an overview of the assets used to deliver services to the public. Its purpose is to provide a high-level view of the management of public assets,...
Completed
Jun 2013
Social media is now in widespread use, in New Zealand and throughout the world. In our public sector, many entities use social media as one of their "channels" for communicating with the public. It can be used passively to monitor how an entity is talked about, more actively to broadcast information to the public, or as a means to discuss and debate. Social media can be used to create, share, and...
Completed
May 2013
Ngā tapuwae o mua, mo muri Footsteps of the past, to guide the future Recent developments in the socio-educational landscape, the economic uncertainty of the times, the rapidly changing demographics of the school-aged populations, and the concerns expressed about the many social problems affecting young people have reignited the discussions over the roles schools are expected to play in...
Completed
May 2013
As Auditor-General, I have a keen interest in the financial sustainability of the public sector. This discussion paper explores international practices and current research in assessing and understanding public sector financial sustainability. The origin of this paper is the research that my Office commissioned for use on our 2012/13 work programme theme Our future needs – is the public sector...
Completed
Apr 2013
This report presents the aggregate results from our audits of central government entities for 2011/12. I also present in-depth results of our audits of government departments, Crown entities, and State-owned enterprises. We have already published our reports on Crown research institutes, local government, and the education, transport, and health sectors. I have also included a section...
Completed
Apr 2013
This is the second year that I am publishing a separate report on audit results for the health sector. This report accompanies my reports on the education and transport sectors, which sit alongside the Crown research institutes, central government, and local government reports. The performance of the public health system – in particular, the district health boards (DHBs) – is important to us...
Completed
Mar 2013
Science and innovation are important to New Zealand's economic growth. The two high-level (government priority) outcomes that the science and innovation sector contributes to are "growing the economy" and "building a healthier environment and society". Crown research institutes (CRIs) are central to the Government's expectation that investing in science makes a significant contribution to New...

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