Department of Corrections

Department of Corrections

Phone: 
04 460 300

The Department of Corrections works to make New Zealand a better, safer place by:protecting the public from those who can cause harmreducing re-offending. Each week we manage 8,500 people in prisons and 30,000 offenders in our communities. Our 8,000 staff are committed to supporting offenders to help them address their offending and gain skills that will help them lead a crime-free life.

35 results found

Research projects

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Completed
2012
A formative evaluation of the 'Tai Aroha' residential community-based programme for high-risk offenders (2012). Since October 2007, the number of community-based sentencing options available to the judiciary increased. This led to an increase in the number of offenders in the community requiring rehabilitative interventions. Although the range of rehabilitative options increased, very few...
Completed
2012
This review covers: trends in youth offending in New Zealand, developmental considerations, interventions and youth offending, characteristics of effective programmes, and specific responsivity (2012).
Completed
Jan 2011
Prisoners serving sentences for sex offences make up around 20 percent of the New Zealand prison population on any given date. As a sub-group within the general offender population, sex offenders share a number of important characteristics. Awareness of those characteristics has relevance for understanding reconviction data of the type presented here. Firstly, victim surveys indicate that, of all...
Completed
Dec 2009
A substantial body of research evidence, known as the “What Works” literature, was influential in the design of the Department’s current sentence management framework.  This literature revolved around a number of key principles of correctional rehabilitation which, if adhered to in the design and delivery of services, would reliably lead to reduced rates of re-offending.  The principles...
Completed
2009
This report is the second in a series of reports which summarise patterns of reconviction (over 5 years) amongst almost 35000 offenders who started community sentences in 2002/03. Offender characteristics such as gender, ethnicity, age at start of sentence, age at first conviction, offence type and offenders’ previous criminal history are each examined with reference to reconviction and...
Completed
15 Sep 2008
Reducing re-offending is an important outcome objective for most correctional services. As such, measures of recidivism, particularly reconviction and re-imprisonment rates, are key indicators of those services’ performance. The data presented here are based on the “recidivism index” (RI) methodology used in the Department of Corrections’ (“the Department’s”) annual reporting of reconviction...
Completed
15 Sep 2008
I am pleased to introduce this report as it provides a wealth of information on re-offending patterns amongst released prisoners. The statistical information in this report is based on a cohort of offenders released from prison sentences in New Zealand over a 12 months period in 2002-2003. While there is no reason to believe that overall rates of re-imprisonment in New Zealand are worse...
Completed
13 Jun 2008
In 2006 the Department of Corrections was directed by the Government to investigate the use of Home Detention with respect to differences in the rate at which it was applied to Maori and Pacific peoples. This paper reports on the resulting study, which used data from Home Detention cases in 2005. It examines ethnicity-based differences in offenders obtaining Leave to Apply for Home Detention,...
Completed
13 May 2008
Māori are disproportionately represented in criminal justice statistics to an alarming degree. This paper attempts to shed light on why this is so. It examines the issue by considering the evidence for two different (though not mutually exclusive) explanatory approaches: that bias operates within the criminal justice system, such that any suspected or actual offending by Māori has harsher...
Completed
2008
This report summarises patterns of reconviction and imprisonment, over a 48 months period, amongst almost 35,000 offenders who started community sentences (Supervision, Community Work) and orders (front-end Home Detention) during the 12 months period 1 July 2002 to 30 June 2003. The analysis reveals important differences of reconviction behaviour of different sub-groups of offenders who...

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