Ministry for Women

Phone: 
04 915 7112

The Ministry of Women’s Affairs,  Te Minitatanga mō ngā Wāhine,  is the Government’s principal advisor on achieving better results for women, and wider New Zealand. The Ministry has three priority areas: greater economic independence, more women in leadership and increased safety from violence. 

 The Ministry’s main responsibilities are: 

  • Policy advice on improving outcomes for women in New Zealand 
  • Managing New Zealand’s international obligations in relation to the status of women 
  • Providing suitable women nominees for appointment to state sector boards and committees 
  • Providing support services to the Minister of Women’s Affairs 

 

44 results found

Research projects

Sort by: Title Date
Commissioned
Mar 2017
The research report Empirical evidence of the gender pay gap in New Zealand  (led by Professor Gail Pacheco from AUT) tells us about the factors behind the gender pay gap and helps us focus our efforts. It is the first comprehensive update of the factors behind the national gender pay gap since 2003.
Completed
28 Feb 2017
Effect of motherhood on pay – methodology and full results presents the methodology and analysis we used in our investigation of a ‘motherhood penalty’ in New Zealand. It is intended for those interested in the technical details behind the findings we present in Effect of motherhood on pay – summary of results.  
Completed
2016
Minister for Women Louise Upston has submitted the Government’s latest report to the United Nations on New Zealand’s efforts to eliminate discrimination against women. New Zealand is required to periodically report on the country’s performance under the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW). This is the eighth report New Zealand has provided since...
Completed
Dec 2015
The Ministry for Women's new report, A malu i 'āiga, e malu fo'i i fafo: Protection for the family, protection for all, shares, from the perspective of Samoan people, what works to keep Samoan women and girls safe from violence. The Ministry is encouraging discussion on the findings to broaden cultural attitudes to violence prevention and ensure policy makers design effective ways to keep women...
Completed
Aug 2015
Getting it done shares what the Ministry and its Canterbury partners have learnt over the past two years. Following the 2010 and 2011 earthquakes, data showed a significant negative impact on women’s employment in Canterbury. This report discusses how the work of the Ministry and its partners has led to increasing numbers of women training and working in trades in Canterbury. This report...
Completed
2015
Primary prevention of violence against women is an approach that seeks to stop violence against women before it occurs in the first place.  It is an internationally emerging field of practice with a growing evidence base about what works.  However, research on how it is understood and how effective it is in diverse cultural contexts is limited.  Māori women are twice as likely...
Completed
Apr 2014
This bibliography is a quick reference of abstracts on ways to improve women’s career paths within organisations. We have referenced 117 items, organised them into seven topic areas, and provided a brief summary of each item. Articles covering more than one topic have been included in each relevant area. Building on the research used on Realising the opportunity,we have included other...
Completed
Mar 2014
This paper looks at improving the economic independence of women with low or no qualifications; women who are not in education, training or employment; and Māori and Pacific women.
Completed
2014
This paper proposes that work cultural changes are needed to increase opportunities for women to achieve at the highest level, and stop them from dropping out of the ‘leadership pipeline’. The research identifies three barriers to women continuing to advance their careers at the same rate as men. These barriers have been identified as:  unconscious bias against women taking up...
Completed
2014
It is tempting for policy-makers to subtract young mothers aged 15 to 24 from the NEET group, assuming young mothers have intentionally disengaged with employment, education and training due to their involvement in a caregiving role. This paper tests this assumption and identifies that not all NEET young mothers are out of the labour force by choice.  We find that nearly half of young...

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