Acceptability of extended smokefree areas and smokefree cars: In Fact

The 2012 Health and Lifestyles Survey (HLS) included four questions that assessed people’s acceptability of extending smokefree areas to other public places and private vehicles where children are in them.

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Commissioning agencies
Date of last publication
2013

Methodology

The 2012 Health and Lifestyles Survey (HLS) included four questions that assessed people’s acceptability of extending smokefree areas to other public places and private vehicles where children are in them. Responses to these questions were compared by smoking status (current smokers: those who smoked at least monthly, ex-smokers, and never smokers), ethnicity, neighbourhood deprivation status, age, gender, and educational background. Statistically significant differences between groups (p < .05) are reported.

Key Results

  • There was a high agreement (93%) with banning smoking in cars where children are in them, and this finding was consistent across different population groups.
  • Over one-half of respondents agreed that smoking should not be allowed in public outdoor dining areas (54%), outside sport fields or courts (59%), or outdoor public places where children are likely to go (73%). Different response patterns were found by smoking status and ethnicity (see Figures 1 and 2).

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